Dunnottar Mains


Bed & Breakfast

Long Term Booking

We are happy to let our rooms in the long term, minimum stay 3 nights. For more information try here

Stonehaven

For more details on what Stonehaven and the surrounding area has to offer try here

4 Star Award4 Star Award

Here at Dunnottar Mains we have been awarded 4 Star status from the British Tourist Board.

Dunnottar Mains Bed & Breakfast

Dunnottar Castle

Dunnottar Castle is a dramatic and evocative ruin. As you wander around the extensive buildings you are almost surrounded by sea with gulls and other seabirds wheeling and screaming around the cliffs below you.

If the outline is a little familiar, this may be because Dunnottar Castle was the location for the recent film version of Hamlet starring Mel Gibson.

Even if there was no castle at Dunnottar, the site would immediately catch the eye - an enormous flat-topped rock with sheer cliffs on three sides.

  • Dunnottar Castle
  • Inside Dunnottar Castle

As you wander around the extensive buildings - from the keep through the barracks, lodgings, stables and storehouses to the less-ruinous chapel and drawing room - you will discover the importance of Dunnottar, an impregnable Castle that holds many rich secrets of Scotlands colourful past.

William Wallace, Mary Queen of Scots, the Marquis of Montrose and the future King Charles II, all graced the Castle with their presence. Most famously though, it was at Dunnottar Castle that a small garrison held out against the might of Cromwells army for eight months and saved the Scottish Crown Jewels, the Honours of Scotland, from destruction. Crown, sceptre and sword now take pride of place in Edinburgh Castle.

A darker chapter in the history of Dunnottar is that of the Whigs Vault. The gruesome story of the imprisonment in 1685 of a group of Covenanters who refused to acknowledge the Kings supremacy in spiritual matters.

  • Inside Dunnottar Castle
  • Inside Dunnottar Castle

The Castle was the home of the Earls Marischal once one of the most powerful families in the land. The last Earl was convicted of treason for his part in the Jacobite rising of 1715, and as a result his estates, including Dunnottar, were seized by the government.

The buildings were thereafter much neglected until 1925 when the 1st Viscountess Cowdray embarked on a systematic repair of the Castle. The Castle was officially made open to visitors thereafter.